10 Ways an Editor Knows You’re Going to Be a Successful Writer

5. You’re not just willing but passionate about learning and improving. You actively take an interest in leveling up your skills and performance.

1. You have clear and concise communication skills — you’re pleasant, but you get to the point.

2. You don’t JUST have ideas. You have goals. Plans. And the writing samples to prove it.

3. You lean on your strengths. You know what you’re already good at — you don’t need someone else to validate that for you.

4. You have strong ideas and aren’t afraid to run with them — even if writing them out isn’t necessarily your strongest skill yet.

Continue reading “10 Ways an Editor Knows You’re Going to Be a Successful Writer”

12 Reasons You’re Feeling Too Overwhelmed to Write

2. You procrastinated AGAIN come on you can do better than this!

1. You have too many ideas and might need to slow down, take a deep breath, and pick just one.

2. You procrastinated AGAIN come on you can do better than this!

3. You’ve already done a ton of writing recently and your brain just needs a rest.

4. You’re afraid it won’t be “good enough.”

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10 Lies to Stop Telling Yourself After a Rejection

2. “The more rejections I get, the less likely I am to succeed.” The opposite is probably true, actually. 

1. “They rejected me because they don’t like me.” It’s more than likely not personal at all.

2. “The more rejections I get, the less likely I am to succeed.” The opposite is probably true, actually.

3. “I’m a bad writer and I’ll never get better.” Anyone can improve with effort and time.

4. “Nothing I write will ever be good enough.” Not true!

Continue reading “10 Lies to Stop Telling Yourself After a Rejection”

The Imaginary Things Holding You Back | The Blank Page

The emotions behind these things are real, but the things themselves are not.

The Blank Page is a new weekly series on Novelty Revisions dedicated to any writer who is just beginning their journey or starting again after a long pause. Check back every Monday for more tips and inspiration.


Every writer has the chance to reach their full potential. To accomplish great things. To publish words that change lives … and maybe even the world.

Many don’t ever reach their greatest achievements. Not because they don’t want to, but because they give in to their biggest barriers and never manage to get past them.

Here are some of the most common “imaginary” roadblocks and how to overcome them.

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‘Lazy’ Writers Exist — That Doesn’t Mean You’re One of Them

As an editor, I’ve worked with plenty of writers who very obviously don’t want to do the work. There are also writers who try very hard, but are clearly overworked and overwhelmed.

I don’t generally like using the word “lazy” to describe people I don’t know.

But the more writers I work with as an editor, the more I realize that even if writers themselves aren’t lazy people, lazy writing and lazy writing habits DO exist. And they’re an absolute nightmare for the person on the receiving end of the Word document in charge of preparing something for publication.

There are actually pretty obvious differences between “lazy” writers and writers on the other end of the spectrum — those who have worked so hard in such a short amount of time that what I’ll call “silly” errors just sort of … happen.

Just because writers make mistakes doesn’t mean they’re lazy. But certain mistakes are … and trust me, your editor isn’t oblivious to which category you might fall into.

Continue reading “‘Lazy’ Writers Exist — That Doesn’t Mean You’re One of Them”

12 Writing Rules All New Beginners Must Follow

4. Write what you know … until you get comfortable enough to start writing about what you don’t know.

1. When you encounter a new idea, run with it. See where it goes. Don’t hesitate. Just start writing.

2. Write on a set schedule. Not every day, not even every other day. But do have a plan and stick to it. You will never improve if you don’t practice consistently.

3. Don’t use a dictionary. Write using words you know and understand. It’s how you develop your own original style. You can always go back and edit later.

4. Write what you know … until you get comfortable enough to start writing about what you don’t know.

Continue reading “12 Writing Rules All New Beginners Must Follow”

10 Tips for Eliminating Not-so-Obvious Writing Distractions

4. Stop checking your word/page count. Don’t worry about it. Just keep writing.

1. Separate your research/learning/”get hyped” time from your actual writing time.

2. Close your character sketches, your dictionary, your style guide, all your writing tools except the ones you use to physically write. All the other materials are for rewrites and editing. Focus on writing the rough draft first.

3. Don’t eat while you write! I know, I know, it’s your go-to thing. But even when you’re mindlessly reaching for food while thinking, it’s still slowing you down.

4. Stop checking your word/page count. Don’t worry about it. Just keep writing.

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10 Pointless Writing Habits to Drop If You Want to Save Time

2. Setting writing goals that are too big/ambitious.

1. Obsessing over doing anything related to writing the “right” or “wrong” way. The only way we learn what works best for us is by trying different things. There is no “one way.”

2. Setting writing goals that are too big/ambitious. You should push yourself, but not to the point of forcing yourself into a state of overwhelm/anxiety. If you have to set small goals, even just for today, set small goals.

3. Refusing to use anything other than your “go-to” writing tool — e.g., if you don’t have your laptop with you, you won’t write. Learn to write anywhere, with anything.

4. Insisting on writing everything in order from start to finish. If you feel inspired to write something but it doesn’t belong in your next sentence … skip your next sentence for now. Nothing is going to break.

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The Energy You Spend on Writing Only Goes So Far

You’ve probably heard some variation of the idea that each of us has our own finite amount of daily energy that we can spend on various tasks.

You’ve probably heard some variation of the idea that each of us has our own finite amount of daily energy that we can spend on various tasks.

Writers and other creators have the added complication of having to figure out how not to spend all their energy on the “essential” activities of their days to leave some left over for writing.

It’s OK if you’re not very good at this.

It turns out many of us aren’t. But here’s how you can try.

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12 Things to Tell Your Past Writer Self

4. Don’t wait for feedback to pursue a story idea. Just start chasing it.

1. As long as you keep writing, you will always, in some way, keep improving.

2. Comparing your writing to others’ writing only sets you up for disappointment.

3. Just because no one tells you your writing is good doesn’t mean it isn’t.

4. Don’t wait for feedback to pursue a story idea. Just start chasing it.

Continue reading “12 Things to Tell Your Past Writer Self”