10 Reasons You Should Start a Blog Today. Yes, Right Now!

5. Many writers start out posting to their own personal blogs — not because they have to, but because it’s a great place to start when you don’t have any other writing experience.

1. You’re already reading one (and a post about this very topic), so you must already want to do it!

2. The longer you wait to do something, the harder it will be to actually do it. Just do it. Just go all in.

3. Blogging is one of the best ways to desensitize yourself to the fear of putting your work out there, because at first, pretty much no one sees it anyway. This is a good thing.

4. To get better at writing, you have to practice. And there’s no better way to practice writing than to do it through writing about a topic you genuinely love.

Continue reading “10 Reasons You Should Start a Blog Today. Yes, Right Now!”

If You Don’t Act Like You Deserve Success as a Writer, You’ll Never Earn It

I doubt myself because I’m human. We all do it.

Every time I reach out to a potential client, prepare a submission for a publication, or apply for a writing job, there is still always a part of me that thinks, even for the briefest of moments: “I don’t deserve this.”

It’s part imposter syndrome, part self-doubt — because of course it is. But it still “is.” I’ve been writing professionally since 2012, writing in general for even longer than that, and still — STILL — I often find myself shaking my head whenever I’m pursuing another opportunity. Why would they pick me? I’m just one among thousands. There’s nothing about my portfolio or credentials that make me stand out.

This may be true in some contexts. I don’t mind the fact that my blog is still considered “small” despite the fact that it’s over 10 years old, for example, because the majority of aspiring writers probably have blogs in which they publish posts about writing. I’m one of many. Happy to help whomever might come along, but the idea for this blog was far, far from original.

But for the most part, I’ve been doing this long enough that I do have a pretty good idea of how to win over an editor with my words, land a job interview, pitch a story, and the like. My portfolio is anything but lacking in sample material. That’s what happens when you stick with something for almost a decade.

I doubt myself because I’m human. We all do it.

So how, then, does one manage to find success when they’re so unsure of their ability to do so?

The answer is, on the surface, simple. You can very easily doubt your ability to achieve something and still act like you deserve it. Even if it feels like you’re lying to yourself.

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We Start With the Stories We Know By Heart | The Blank Page

For me, storytelling has become a strategic art — how can I take a familiar experience and expand it to relate to a greater audience?

The Blank Page is a new weekly series on Novelty Revisions dedicated to any writer who is just beginning their journey or starting again after a long pause. Check back every Monday for more tips and inspiration.


“Write what you know” has become one of those creative mantras that people tend to take too far. When we talk about telling familiar stories, we’re not saying writers should ONLY write what they know best. In fact, one of the best ways to grow as a storyteller is to craft narratives that aren’t all that familiar to you, at least at their start.

But this semi-infamous mantra does have an important meaning in the context of beginners. Aspiring writers have a lot to worry about as they’re in the very early stages of constructing the frameworks of their first tales. The last thing they need is to take on a story that’s so challenging and out of their comfort zone that they end up quitting because it’s a little too far beyond their current skill level.

“Writing what you know” is generally advice reserved for those new to this game. Which makes it a perfect place to start if you’re reading this now.

Continue reading “We Start With the Stories We Know By Heart | The Blank Page”

You’ll Always Remember Your First (Draft)

I didn’t want to have to say goodbye to some of the things I loved most about the version of the story I’d started with. Which was exactly why I knew I had to.

It seemed almost impossible, the idea of letting go.

I’d spent so many months working so hard to tell the version of that story that first came to me. At the time, everything felt right. Necessary. Not perfect, but not too many steps below that all the same.

The moment I realized my story was going to have to change — not in a monumental way, but enough that I couldn’t just fix the spelling errors and call it done — my heart broke.

I loved these characters just the way they were. I liked most of the scenes. I didn’t want to have to say goodbye to some of the things I loved most about the version of the story I’d started with.

Which was exactly why I knew I had to.

Continue reading “You’ll Always Remember Your First (Draft)”

12 Signs Your Writing Is Going to Get Better (Eventually)

4. You have at least one clear goal about what you want your writing to accomplish someday.

1. You read. A lot. The more you read, the more you learn to recognize patterns in others’ work as well as your own, as well as which of your own tendencies you’d like to correct or focus on.

2. You don’t just sit around talking about how you want to be a better writer. You spend most of your available time actually writing … so that you can become a better writer.

3. Even if you don’t write every day (which isn’t actually a requirement), you do make it a point to give writing your full attention on a regular basis.

4. You have at least one clear goal about what you want your writing to accomplish someday.

Continue reading “12 Signs Your Writing Is Going to Get Better (Eventually)”

10 Great Reasons to Come Back to Writing After You’ve Walked Away

6. Stories have the ability to change people, to change lives, even to change the world.

1. It’s on your own terms. If writing is something you want to do, no one can stop you from doing it. If you want to choose to invite writing back into your life, you can. You are in control.

2. You’ve had your time to reflect, to rest, to figure out why you needed to set your writing aside, forgive yourself, and accept that it’s OK to start again. If you want to.

3. Life feels empty, even lonely when you aren’t writing. When you are, you feel alive in a way you simply don’t at any other point.

4. You’re feeling inspired to tell a story you can’t get out of your head. What do you have to lose?

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10 Signs You’re Ready to Start Sharing Your Writing With the World

4. You’re so proud of what you’ve written that you don’t even care about its flaws. You just want other people to know it exists!

1. You have a finished, polished piece of writing that’s ready for eyes that are not your own.

2. You’re not afraid of criticism, but you’re not desperate for it, either. Sharing your work doesn’t automatically generate feedback, which shouldn’t be the only reason you’re making your work public.

3. You’re doing it because you want to, not because someone else says you should.

4. You’re so proud of what you’ve written that you don’t even care about its flaws. You just want other people to know it exists!

Continue reading “10 Signs You’re Ready to Start Sharing Your Writing With the World”

12 Tips to Help Writers Feel Less Overwhelmed With … Everything

2. Trim down your to-do list.

1. Find your go-to relaxation technique. It doesn’t have to be traditional meditation or yoga or anything like that. For you it could be taking a walk, listening to music, or baking. But you need that non-writing thing to turn to.

2. Trim down your to-do list. When you’re feeling overwhelmed already, trying to maintain the same level of productivity — or increasing it — is only going to intensify that feeling.

3. Focus on one “essential” task and one “nonessential” task. Write if you have to, write if you want to, but try to fixate your thoughts on just one project at a time until your work on that project for the day is done.

4. Leave room in your schedule for “nothing time.” What you end up doing with that time is completely up to you, but keep it spontaneous, even if nothing else in your day is.

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People Need to Walk Away From Your Story Feeling Something

Sometimes we forget how powerful stories are.

I’m writing this after watching the series finale of a show I love. And while I won’t get into specifics (because let’s be real, that’s not why you’re here), that’s weighing heavily on my mind as I’m sitting here in awe that something fictional can have such a strong impact on my emotional well-being. Not just me. Thousands of people.

Sometimes we forget how powerful stories are.

How impactful they can be.

When you’re sitting alone in front of a computer screen and you’re squeezing a story out of your brain one sentence at a time, it’s easy to completely ignore the fact that while your words are important and your work matters, without the emotional weight of the story you are trying to tell, it’s all meaningless.

I just finished reading a book I didn’t care for, and it took me until now to realize it wasn’t the writing or the characters or the subject matter that lost me. It was the lack of emotion I felt while reading it. I wanted to care about what happened to each character. But I didn’t. I felt nothing.

And that made what could have been an entertaining book seem almost pointless to me.

That’s not what you want your audience to take away from your story … is it?

Continue reading “People Need to Walk Away From Your Story Feeling Something”

When You Just Want to Be Good at Writing Already | The Blank Page

When experts say starting is the hardest part of learning something new, in most cases, they’re right.

The Blank Page is a new weekly series on Novelty Revisions dedicated to any writer who is just beginning their journey or starting again after a long pause. Check back every Monday for more tips and inspiration.


When I held my violin for the first time four months ago, there was a small part of me that wished I could just start playing my favorite songs without breaking a sweat.

I did sweat the first time I played, though. Seriously. Playing the violin is not physically natural. The struggle is real.

The same thing often happens with beginning writers who are just getting the hang of all the processes involved in telling a story from start to finish. They just want to be able to write a gosh darn story without having to stop every ten seconds to question every single word they’ve just written.

When experts say starting is the hardest part of learning something new, in most cases, they’re right. It doesn’t matter if you’re trying to teach yourself how to play the most challenging instrument or struggling to write a book as good as the best one you’ve ever read. Starting something and sticking with it — especially when you’re honestly just terrible at it — just happens to be something not everyone can do successfully.

But what separates those who succeed from those who don’t — those who can keep squeaking away until they start to play real notes or continue to write bad stories until they accidentally crank out a good one compared to those who can’t?

It’s not money. It’s not even talent or the resources you do or don’t have available to you.

It’s resilience — something you can only build through failure.

Continue reading “When You Just Want to Be Good at Writing Already | The Blank Page”