12 Reminders for Writers Who Might Be Afraid to Let Their Favorite Story Go

5. Just because you never publish it doesn’t mean it never mattered.

1. All stories must end.

2. All writers must say farewell to familiar characters and places to make room for creating new ones.

3. You are not a “failure” for leaving a beloved story behind.

4. In fact, the best writers are the ones who can let go, move on, and look back only in positive, constructive reflection.

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10 Reasons to Write Even When It Feels Like No One’s Listening

4. More work happens behind closed doors than you might realize. You have to put in the time before you can enjoy the results.

1. Even when you don’t think writing will make you feel better, it always does.

2. Just because no one tells you they’re reading doesn’t mean they aren’t.

3. Alone time with your characters isn’t all bad. In fact, it’s some of the most precious time you’ll have as a storyteller.

4. More work happens behind closed doors than you might realize. You have to put in the time before you can enjoy the results.

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Trying to Be Everything | The Blank Page

There will be pressure to split your soul into many parts. Don’t do that.

The Blank Page is a new weekly series on Novelty Revisions dedicated to any writer who is just beginning their journey or starting again after a long pause. Check back every Monday for more tips and inspiration.


I learned very quickly after signing my first contract agreeing to my first paid writing job that in amateur publishing, being a writer did not mean you were “just” a writer.

Someone who desperately wanted to impress her editors — why wouldn’t you, at 19, working in a ridiculously competitive field since literally every young adult wants to be a writer for some reason I guess? — couldn’t get by just turning in 500 words plain without flavor. It wasn’t enough to submit nearly flawless copy. It needed a photo. A graphic of some kind. A custom-made chart? It didn’t NEED it. Well, no one said it did. That was implied.

You weren’t paid to be a photographer or a graphic designer. You weren’t paid to spend your free time learning how to shoot and edit video, use Google Analytics or interpret basic SEO recommendations. These were just all things you did. That’s how you stood out: By trying to be everything.

If only someone had told that exhausted, burned-out aspiring writer that just because it made you more marketable didn’t mean it was worth the misery.

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Start Writing a Story That Wakes You Up

I’ve believed for a long time that stories choose their tellers.

Everyone has something they love to do so much that they wake up every morning like it’s a holiday — because they’re so excited to get out of bed and do more of that thing they love. You just have to find your thing.

The second I heard some version of this mantra, my life changed forever.

In all honestly, the biggest downside to writing professionally is that you often have to write, edit, and complete other tasks you’re not overly enthusiastic about. People talk about writing like it’s this glorious stress-free career, and perhaps for some people and at some points it might seem that way. But the reality is that you don’t get to spend every single moment of every day doing what you love most.

So when people actually started paying me to write things for them, I had this brief existential crisis. Up until that point I had always dreamed of publishing a novel, of writing fiction for a living and never having to write a 20-page listicle ever again. And yet there I was, writing every day because it was my job — but not the kind of writing I’d always thought I would be doing.

I became extremely discouraged the more I thought about how my dreams weren’t coming true, at least not as quickly or in the exact fashion I’d hoped they would.

Then someone told me to find my “thing.” Or in this case, my story. The one that woke me up.

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12 Small Things That Will Always Inspire You to Keep Writing

4. Reading, watching, and listening to a variety of stories.

Even though this blog will continue posting as normal about the usual topics during this time, I just want you to know that no matter who you are, even if I don’t know you, you matter to me. I’m doing everything I can to amplify the voices that need to be heard right now on the appropriate platforms. Stay safe. Keep going. And take care of yourself.

And please consider being part of the solution.


1. Stories — or real-life events — that don’t end the way you wished they would have.

2. Walking into a bookstore or library — sometimes, that’s really all it takes. Maybe.

3. Let’s take that one step further. Dies anyone else ever just pick up and hold a book and think: “I want my name on one of these?”

4. Reading, watching, and listening to a variety of stories.

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11 Tiny, Simple Things You Can Do Today to Make Progress on Your Writing Goals

2. Write something that makes you genuinely happy. Remind yourself that you still love doing what you do, even when it becomes challenging.

1. Spend some time journaling. Even if it doesn’t help you sort through your thoughts, it’s a great way to force yourself to focus on a single task and just dump the entire contents of your brain into a private safe space.

2. Write something that makes you genuinely happy. Remind yourself that you still love doing what you do, even when it becomes challenging.

3. Set a timer for five minutes. Only start that timer when you actually start writing, and keep writing until those five minutes are up. If you want to keep going after that, you can. But you don’t have to.

4. Write the elevator pitch for the story you’re working on … or the story you want to start working on.

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10 Signs You’re Writing the Story That’s ‘Meant’ for You

5. You connect on a deep level with your characters … because parts of them are also parts of you.

1. You’ve always wanted to read a story like this. You just couldn’t ever find one.

2. It allows you to speak to your own life experiences without having to make it all about you and your life.

3. It makes you feel extremely vulnerable … but you sort of don’t mind.

4. The parts you don’t like, you only don’t like because you want them — and the story as a whole — to be the best it can possibly be.

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Writers: Remember How Far You’ve Come

Progress isn’t easy to see or hear or detect. We’re not always, as ironic as it is, qualified to judge the improvement (or lack thereof?) of our own writing over time.

Even though this blog will continue posting as normal about the usual topics during this time, I just want you to know that no matter who you are, even if I don’t know you, you matter to me. I’m doing everything I can to amplify the voices that need to be heard right now on the appropriate platforms. Stay safe. Keep going. And take care of yourself.

And please consider being part of the solution.


For many people, writing is the one thing that calms the mind, cleanses the soul, and warms the heart. Even for those who aren’t necessarily interested in turning their writing hobby into a career, feeling as though you aren’t getting any better at what you’re doing — even when you are — is a common and frustrating occurrence.

That’s one of the toughest things about writing for many of us. Progress isn’t easy to see or hear or detect. We’re not always, as ironic as it is, qualified to judge the improvement (or lack thereof?) of our own writing over time. That’s often not a great feeling.

There are a lot — A LOT — of things to be discouraged about as a writer. This is a tough business. It’s not always inclusive, it’s not always fair or simple or even fun. It can take years of nonstop hard work, rejection, and small, seemingly insignificant wins to get you to a place where success is possible.

But that doesn’t mean writing through your disappointment isn’t worth it. It doesn’t mean there aren’t good parts, or that you’ll always be miserable doing what you so desperately want to do.

You really have to put in the effort, in all this, to find and hold onto the positives. One way to do that is to reflect not only on where you want to go, but also where you’ve been.

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Read What Inspires You to Write

I always say you should never go looking for inspiration. That doesn’t mean you can’t make an effort to create the ideal environment for it to blossom.

It happens to me almost every single time I read a YA book.

As soon as I finish it, I aggressively fight the urge to start writing a new YA book.

I mean, there’s a reason I have neither written nor read as much as I would have liked to at this point in my life. Sometimes I have to take a YA reading hiatus because, well, it’s just going to give me too many book ideas. More than I can handle for the time being, anyway.

Still, it’s not the worst thing in the world to realize you have too many ideas and not nearly enough time.

I always say you should never go looking for inspiration. That doesn’t mean you can’t make an effort to create the ideal environment for it to blossom.

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Why Writers Must Make Mistakes | The Blank Page

All writers mess up. Successful writers only make a specific mistake once, and never again. How? By their willingness to learn.

The Blank Page is a new weekly series on Novelty Revisions dedicated to any writer who is just beginning their journey or starting again after a long pause. Check back every Monday for more tips and inspiration.


Having been a professional writer for going on eight years (that’s not a lot to some of you out there, I know), I’m no longer ashamed to admit that throughout my time as a writer, as a hobbyist and in my career, I’ve messed up pretty bad on more than one occasion.

My past self has missed deadlines, forfeited assignments, and made excuses. I’ve written things I didn’t know at the time were insensitive to certain groups of people (thankfully on my own time, not for the public to witness — in most cases). I’ve spelled people’s names wrong. I’ve unknowingly published facts that weren’t true thinking they were.

But none of these things were really ever intentional. And that’s how I’ve managed to grow beyond the missteps I’ve taken since I first started writing for my university’s student newspaper. I’ve learned how to manage my procrastination habits. I’ve become a better listener and have educated myself in matters of diversity to the point where I know not only what might offend a member of my audience, but also when to do more research when I’m unsure.

And now that someone pays me to fact-check, well, I’ve gotten a lot better at that, too. That one’s not really optional.

Sure, I’ve messed up a lot. But that doesn’t mean I’m unreliable, or that I’m going to make the same mistakes in the future.

All writers mess up. Successful writers only make a specific mistake once, and never again. How? By their willingness to learn.

Continue reading “Why Writers Must Make Mistakes | The Blank Page”