Why Do People Keep Asking Me to Write Their Emails for Them?

I DID NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS.

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At some point in your writing career, you’ll start getting requests — both credible and not so much. People will start asking you to write for them. And for reasons I can’t fully understand, no matter what kind of writing you do, the majority of these requests will be marketing-related.

I’m not a business owner or a marketing expert, so I can’t tell you for sure why this happens. But of all the emails I’ve ever gotten asking me to write things, I’d say about half of them assume I am a marketing copywriter desperate for work. Which I am not.

It’s almost to the point that I regret ever listing “writer” as something I’m trained to do anywhere on the internet. Somehow, that translates to “you must be really good at writing emails that promote our products.” Even though I’m 100 percent not good at that at all.

Actually, to be honest, I hate it. I hate writing anything that is trying to sell a product or service, especially if it’s my own. I’m not afraid to admit that. Because I don’t need to write marketing copy to make a living. Maybe that’s just me.

But I really wish people would stop asking me to do this kind of work. Nowhere on my LinkedIn, Twitter, or Upwork profiles do I mention I am trained to and/or able to work in marketing. I’ve taken a handful of marketing classes in my 6 years of higher education, but guess what? I neither have a degree or certificate in marketing nor did I particularly enjoy any of those courses.

I’m talking business here — I host a blog, which means yes, sometimes I post things that promote that blog. But that’s about as far as I’ll go at this point, because I am trained to write articles and novels and press releases. Please stop asking me to write your emails for you. I don’t get how I got on your list but I don’t want to be on it anymore.

I suppose people hunt for writers to do this kind of work because good writing sells. I get that. I also get that it’s probably not difficult to find work as a marketing copywriter, even if it might not pay well. At least that’s what I have to assume, considering how often I’m approached to do it even though I’m not at all qualified to.

These people are sending me emails asking me to write emails. That seems wrong to me. Someone wrote that email, and it seemed fine to me, so why can’t they do it? What happened to them? Are they OK? Should I be concerned for their safety?

Of course, it’s more than just emails — landing pages and website copy and HOW DID I GET SIGNED UP FOR THIS?

I DON’T KNOW WHAT TO DO.

I’ll gladly forward to you all the requests I get for this kind of work, if you want it. I mean it. I don’t like confrontation. I don’t want to reply to all these emails in all caps screaming “PLEASE DON’T YOU UNDERSTAND I DON’T WRITE THIS STUFF EVER?”

Save me. Please.


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a freelance writer and a nine-time NaNoWriMo winner with work published in Teen Ink, Success Story, Lifehack and USA TODAY College. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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