The Best Writing Tools Won’t Make You a Better Writer

Don’t buy something because you think it’ll fix all your problems.

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The most common question I used to see in Facebook writing groups was something along the lines of, “Which writing program do you use to write?”

Some asked this question out of pure curiosity. Nothing wrong with that.

But others seemed desperate to find the perfect app that would help them get their writing done. And part of me really struggled to understand what the big deal was.

I’m a Microsoft Word/Google Docs gal. They’re simple, user-friendly, and I don’t have to fuss over any fancy functions. I just open them and start writing.

A lot of people, I’m sure, just fret over these things while taking breaks. They’re not spending all their writing time shopping around for the latest gadgets to make them better writers.

But there are some beginners who are. Even if it’s only a small number of them.

That’s still a lot of people obsessing over software instead of actually writing.

And that worries me.

I love technology. It’s the only part of me that’s truly, stereotypically millennial. I’d go nuts if I had to sit in a room with a typewriter and nothing else around to play with.

Tools are great. Sometimes they can help us accomplish things we otherwise might not be able to.

But they’re just tools. They won’t turn you into the writer you’ve always wanted to be. Not by themselves.

Tools help you along the way. They might save some time, make a few small tasks easier — they might even be exactly what you need to get out of your rut and start writing regularly again.

But tools aren’t going to fix all your problems. They aren’t going to do the work for you.

Take activity trackers, for example. More than one study has shown many people do not lose weight after using technology to help them reach their goals. But that isn’t because these trackers aren’t helpful, or that some people can’t use them to their advantage. Too many people expect an activity tracker to do all the work for them, when in reality, they’re nothing more than accountability watches. If you want to lose weight, you have to do the work. You have to change what you eat and how you exercise. A watch cannot do that for you.

It’s the same thing with writing apps, or fancy word processing software. I understand why people want these things. It’s exciting, and in many instances, something new can actually prove helpful when you’re trying to get back on track.

But a piece of software isn’t going to do the writing for you. And even though you’re aware of this, it’s possible you’re still going to get disappointed when the initial thrill of getting a new toy wears off. “Wow. I really thought this would change everything.”

You can’t just change your setup. You have to change your habits — and your attitude, too. If you haven’t been writing, and you want to, or if you’ve been writing, but you want to write better, go ahead. Buy the new thing. Get the tool. But understand that if you aren’t fully willing to do the responsible thing and work even when you don’t want to, even when it gets difficult, you’re just going to end up buying a really expensive paperweight, or take up valuable space on your phone, or whatever.

It seems like common sense. I know. But you’d be surprised how easily we’re tricked by marketers into truly believing something tangible will change our habits.

Granted, sometimes it works — I bought a Fitbit this spring after not working out for 3 months and dove right back into a regular fitness routine, and haven’t fallen out of it since. Maybe you bought a new word processing app and you’ve already written half a novel on it. I’m not saying these things don’t work.

It’s just that they don’t work the same way for everyone. If you aren’t easily self-motivated, even a low-level form of external motivation just might not be enough for you.

Be prepared for those hard moments, when even that new tool won’t be enough to get you off Netflix to get some writing done.

Remember that successful writers write. They worry a lot less about what they’re using to get the work done and a lot more about actually working. It’s fun to try new ways of doing things. I’m not against that at all. (I just bought a new camera, even though the camera on my iPhone works perfectly fine. Because I could.) Just make sure you’re actually staying productive when you need to. Don’t let the shiny stuff distract you too much from your end goals.


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a nine-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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All Writing Counts

What makes you a “real” writer?

There are writing “experts” who will tell you having a blog doesn’t make you a “real” writer, because there are millions of blogs on the internet, and yours isn’t any different than most others.

There are those who will tell you self-publishing doesn’t count as “really” being published, because anyone can publish anything they want to on the internet.

Even if you write thousands of words a day on your own time, it doesn’t really count if you keep them all to yourself and never publish them. At least, that’s what some will try to tell you.

Don’t listen to them.

Is being published online — in a journal or magazine or someone’s ebook — an amazing, worthwhile experience? Yes. Is it the milestone, for many, that finally allows them to define themselves as a published author? Yes.

But that does not mean you are not a real writer, or that your work does not matter, if you only ever have a blog, or if you never officially or “traditionally” publish anything at all.

All writing counts. Both good writing and bad writing. Published work and forever hidden prose. A blog that gets millions of pageviews a day or a small blog that gets 50 views a month. It counts. If you are writing, and you are learning and growing and you feel fulfilled and you are happy being able to write things, IT COUNTS.

Because there are self-proclaimed aspiring writers out there who do not write. Who have only written one thing, and are convinced they cannot write anything else until that one thing gets published. Who believe success will somehow find them, that they’ll get lucky, despite barely trying to build the foundations necessary for writing success to unfold.

If you’re writing and writing and writing, whether you think it’s good or not, whether you’ve been able to convince yourself to publish it or not, you’re doing something right. You’re making an effort. You’re putting yourself out there. Who cares if every attempt you make is a “success” or not? We all fall short sometimes. Even I still write articles that totally bomb, every single week. IT HAPPENS. We learn from what doesn’t work and we keep moving forward.

The most important thing is that you’re writing. Because, like playing an instrument or doing a yoga pose or baking a cake, you perform better the more you do it. It’s called “refining your craft.” It doesn’t usually feel like you’re making any progress. But trust me, the only way to NOT make progress in writing is to not write anything at all.

Don’t ever let anyone tell you what you’re working on “doesn’t count” or that it doesn’t make you a “real” writer. If someone claims to know what a “real” writer is, chances are, they aren’t one.

What makes you a writer is that you write, you tell stories, you let your creativity take you on a journey. Maybe others will come along for the ride someday. Maybe they won’t. Either way, it still counts. You’re still doing just fine.


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a nine-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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The Writing Barrier No One Talks About

Trusting strangers feels wrong.

In the grand scheme of things, the writing process itself is not the hardest part.

Neither is self-editing, or rewriting, or finally constructing that dreaded query letter.

The hardest part happens when you lose control of your story.

Because that’s the whole reason you wrote it in the first place — to take control of a narrative. Alone.

One of the hardest things a writer has to do — and the one thing that stops many writers from ever moving forward in pursuit of their dreams — is hand their work off to someone else.

It’s like sending your baby off to kindergarten for the first time. You no longer have complete control over what happens to them. They’re in someone else’s hands, someone else’s care, now.

And there’s nothing you can do about it.

As much as you want your work critiqued — no matter how desperate you are to hear whether or not you’ve done a good job — you don’t want someone to pick it apart. To scrutinize it. To change it, without your consent, in ways you never would have if you’d been in charge.

I still hate when the draft I send to a publication isn’t the exact piece that’s eventually published. And I’ve been doing this fir six years now.

And yet.

If you only limit yourself to your blog, where you have complete control over what gets published and what doesn’t, you’re wasting a thousand opportunities to grow. To thrive.

Even though it hurts to watch your precious work go through revisions, deep down, you know it’s for the best. You know that editor is either going to work their magic and turn your “just okay” thing into something beautiful, or they’re going to hand it back to you and say it’s better off never widely read.

Or you’re going to hear the words we all dread most: “It’s not ready for the world … yet.”

But still. STILL. At least a part of you feels relieved that someone has told you the truth. That someone has taken the time to show you what your manuscript could be one day, if you keep working on it.

We want criticism, yet we’re terrified of it.

Mostly, we’re scared to be told what we’ve written isn’t good enough.

Well, guess what? It’s a scary thing. Trusting strangers goes against everything we were told growing up. Yet here we are, sending our masterpieces off to someone, not knowing what it might look like when they send it back. If they ever do.

But really … what do we have to lose?

What’s the point, if you never take a chance — if you never at least TRY?

You never know what will happen. There’s no way to predict the outcome.

But don’t let that stop you from submitting. And definitely don’t let it keep you from writing.

We’re all afraid of something. It’s the writers who can press through it and Do the Writing Thing anyway that will one day succeed.


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a nine-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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Reading Your Own Words Isn’t Fun. Here’s Why You Need to Do It Anyway.

It’s a necessary evil.

My least favorite part of the writing process comes after the actual writing. I dread the moment I have to scroll back up to the top of whatever article or blog post I’ve just finished and reread everything my brain and fingers have just produced.

Reading your own work is about as cringe-worthy as it gets.

Maybe that’s a good thing.

Maybe the reason you’re not getting any better at what you do — the reason you’re not where you want to be in your hobby or career yet — lies within your unwillingness to review and self-reflect.

Yes, looking ahead is important. Yes, it’s unhealthy to dwell on your mistakes and allow your past shortcomings to negatively impact your future.

But can you really expect to grow, to learn, to thrive, if you don’t take the time to critique your own work?

There are plenty of authors who will never read their books again once they’re published. But if you listen closely, you’ll realize most of them refuse because what’s published, in their cases, cannot be changed.

If they could, there’s a lot they would do over again.

Because they’re able — and willing — to recognize that their work is not perfect. They’re aware they still have a lot to learn. No matter how many best-sellers or book-to-screenplay deals they have on their CVs.

Self-reviewing involves a lot of steps, likely many hours of reading and re-reading and thinking, “If I could change this now, here’s how I would make it better.”

This has no value whatsoever, of course, if you just do it for the sake of doing it. What matters is that you review your finished work, take notes, move on to something else, and study and apply what you’ve learned from your reviews to make your next piece of writing better than the last.

Maybe you don’t take the time to do this because you just don’t feel like you have the time.

Maybe you just don’t like feeling uncomfortable, and rereading your own work leaves you with a lesser opinion of yourself.

Whatever your excuse, it’s time to get over it. You can’t always rely on someone else to tell you what you’re doing wrong, or what you could be doing better. You need to develop that drive for self-improvement within your own realm of consciousness. Being aware of your own weaknesses and strengths is a trait many writers do not have — but all of us should.

I don’t like rereading my own work, whether I’ve just written it or I finished it six months or six years ago.

I do it anyway. Because there’s no hope of keeping up with the ever-changing landscape of the online publishing world — or pulling ahead — if I don’t suck it up and do what needs to be done.

It will make you a better writer.

It will fix many of the things “wrong” with your craft.

You have nothing to lose by doing it. So it’s not even a matter of why — but when.


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a nine-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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Why It Feels Like Your Family and Friends Don’t Support Your Writing

They do still love you, you know.

Have you ever wondered why your friends, neighbors, and even your parents don’t seem to be as excited about your life as a writer as you are?

Does that — their lack of interest in your words — bother or discourage you?

Like any other hobby or profession, we want to surround ourselves with people who share our interests and skill sets. We enjoy talking with like-minded people about the things that get us excited. It’s human nature to want our circles to care about what we care about.

Of course, the internet allows us to find “our people” whether we live in the same city, state, country, or continent or not.

Which could be why it’s often so unsettling when we share our latest blog post with our Facebook friends … and no one we know — not even our moms — interacts with them.

Don’t they care about us? Why are they being so unsupportive?

The truth is … they’re being totally supportive. Passively.

Expecting everyone you know to display deep and endless passion for your work as a writer is kind of like expecting everyone in your coworking space to like Star Wars.

There are many people who love porgs and lightsabers and Jar Jar Binks.

There are plenty of people — most of your family and friends included — who just … don’t.

Writing is your Star Wars.

It isn’t that those close to you don’t care. But it’s very possible they’re either uninterested in what you’re doing, or they just don’t understand it — and don’t, for whatever reason, want to.

It isn’t that your loved ones don’t support you. They most likely do want you to be successful and happy. If they don’t read your work regularly, it’s kind of like my college roommate refusing to watch Revenge of the Sith with me (sigh). It has nothing to do with whether or not she likes or cares about me as a person. Her interests simply lie elsewhere (Harry Potter).

You also have to remember that there are millions, even billions of people around the world who don’t read or pay any attention to your work. You just notice that your family and friends don’t because you know them and want their approval.

You probably don’t care about whether or not the entire population of Kansas reads your blog. That one family member who happens to live in Kansas — and doesn’t read your blog — is just more noticeable to you.

Don’t get too discouraged when people you know seem to ignore what you’re up to. Even better, try to learn more about how they spend their days and evenings — what makes them happy? What do they like? They’re much more likely to show curiosity related to your work and play if you do the same for them.

And if your mom never reads your blog, oh well. Focus your energy on keeping a bunch of faceless strangers happy when she’s not around. You’ll be fine.

(LOVE YOU MOM!)


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a nine-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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Myths About Writing You Need to Stop Believing

These just aren’t (always) true.

1. You need years of experience to become a freelance writer.

2. A blog can’t help you get a real writing job.

3. It’s possible to write a good book on the first try.

4. It’s possible to write a perfect book, ever.

5. You have to have an agent to succeed and make money as a writer.

6. Self-publishing doesn’t count as a real publishing credit.

7. Writers struggle financially throughout the entire span of their careers.

8. If you write, your audience will discover you instantly.

9. Your ideas aren’t unique or special enough.

10. You can’t write that book/article/script because someone else has already written something similar.

11. Your family and friends will always be your biggest supporters.

12. Self-promotion is frowned upon online.

13. As long as you’re good at marketing, you can sell anything you write and it will be well-received.

14. You have to do everything yourself — including designing your own book covers, website, and more.

15. You have to write every day, or you’ll never make it.

16. You shouldn’t apply for writing jobs that seem “too big.”

17. The writing process is a total solitary experience — no one is involved but you.

18. Every aspiring writer should join a critique group, taking writing classes, and get a writing-specific degree.

19. Agents, editors, publishers, and potential employers only want to hear about what you’ve already done.

20. One successful writer’s expert advice is law.

21. Your opinions and ideas don’t matter because you’re not “successful enough” to matter yet.

22. Slow progress means you’re doing something wrong.

23. Bad writing is a waste of time.

24. It’s too late/You’re too old/You’re too young/You’re not ready.

25. Others’ opinions of and responses to your work are the most important thing in the world.


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a nine-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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What No One Tells You About Landing Your First Writing Job

Look forward as often as you look back.

“If you could tackle any creative project while working with us, what would it be?”

This was the first time a hiring manager had ever asked me a question like that during an interview.

I didn’t hesitate. Essentially, I poured my hopes and dreams out in front of me — and along with that, my passion for writing and creating, for health, for an audience I barely even knew.

I got the job.

Not because my writing experience was likely all that different from anyone else’s — let’s be honest — but because I had — always have — my eye on the future.

Did my degrees help? Well, yeah.

Was I asked about my experience, my past accomplishments, my credentials and qualifications? Absolutely. Your potential client/employer needs to know you can show up and do the work without someone having to hold your hand.

But the thing is, everyone who is applying for the job you’re interviewing for probably has similar-sounding experiences and qualifications. On paper, all those applications are going to look extremely familiar to one another — because (ideally) everyone applying meets the same basic requirements. Education, publishing credits, skill sets. And so on.

It’s not just about what you’ve done, or what you can do now, though.

Additionally — maybe even more so — it’s about what you plan on doing in the future. What your ambitions are. How — and in what direction — you want to grow.

Companies and publications aren’t looking for writers who can write well.

They’re looking for people with a passion for creating better content than they ever have before.

That’s not really something you can easily list as a requirement on a job application. Anyone — especially a writer! — can make themselves sound good on paper.

It’s when you get on that phone or Skype call, or when you sit across a table or desk from that person hoping to hire you, that they’ll see whether or not you’re interested in learning, in growing, in striving to create things that will serve a continuously shifting audience demographic.

Publications want writers who have goals. Who will only look back on their previous work as a means of doing better in the future.

So when you’re applying to and interviewing for these jobs, don’t spend the entire time dwelling on everything you’ve already accomplished. That’s boring and unexciting — it’s already happened.

Focus as much of your energy as possible on where you want to go from here.

That one question — “If you could tackle any creative project while working with us, what would it be?” — launched the most productive conversations I had with hiring managers before I got the call that would change my professional life forever.

Look ahead. Only look back if it’s going to help you grow.

Focus on the future. The past is not the predictor of what’s yet to come. Or it shouldn’t be, anyway.

It’s a bar you can rise above. Not something to cling to to keep from falling.

Speak of your passions, your goals, your plans (and how you’re going to execute them). THAT is what makes you marketable. THAT is what makes you stand out from all the other applicants who have just as many blogs and books and years of experience as you.

Good luck!


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a nine-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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What Do You ‘Like’ About Writing? Your Answer Changes Everything

Find the one thing that keeps you motivated. Hold onto it.

Why do you write?

Everyone has their own answer to this question — there is no right or wrong response. Some people do it to relieve stress or sort through their emotional baggage. Others do it to stay connected with the outside world. And of course, there are those who write solely for the paycheck — it happens.

Even still, everyone who writes faces creative blocks. Maybe you’re fine until you hit a point where you’re doing more research than actual writing — and you hate that. Maybe you have no problem getting started, but finishing feels like an absolute foreign concept to you.

Maybe our hangups aren’t the problem, though.

Maybe we’re simply forgetting to look for the parts about writing we enjoy the most.

What you ‘like’ about writing will change the way you personally approach your craft.

Let’s say your favorite thing about writing is being able to share what you know with an audience interested in learning more about that subject.

So even though you might struggle to get started, and you don’t particularly enjoy the writing process itself, you’re much more likely to suck it up and do it anyway — because you care enough about getting your ideas out into the world for others to consume.

Many writers — especially newer aspiring writers (you rock!) — struggle to stay motivated. Everyone has a specific part of the process that either slows them down or stops them completely. Everyone. I struggle with starting. Once I get going, I have no problem getting my work done. But I never start writing exactly at 8 a.m. — it takes me an embarrassingly long time to get going.

That’s been a struggle for me for a long time. But I love researching and crafting stories around evidence so much that I’ve learned to push through it anyway. I’ve found the one thing I really like about the process, and I use that to fuel my motivation — even on Monday mornings, when all I want to do is sit in a beanbag chair, drink coffee, and watch Netflix.

Figure out that one thing you just like — a lot. And run with that. Keep your eye on that, push your way through to that, because whoever told you you’re obligated to love every single step of the process straight up lied. Even as a hobby, there are parts about writing you aren’t going to love. Instead of focusing on what’s hard, let’s try focusing on the highlights — the good stuff. These things are what make the hard parts seem less hard.

This won’t solve all your problems. You’ll still have rough days. You’ll still struggle, sometimes.

But remember: there’s a reason you’re doing this. There’s a part of this whole writing thing that’s keeping you from giving it up completely.

Hold tight to that. Let it carry you through. You won’t be disappointed with the results.


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a nine-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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Writing In the Aftermath of Tragedy

You never know who your words might touch.

When awful things happen in the world, we’re encouraged — often pressured — to take action. To DO something, both to help those in need and to take steps to prevent similar tragedies from occurring again.

Action is important. We can’t just sit around tweeting about how things need to change, then go on with our lives as if that’s going to be enough to actually make a difference.

Yet, as writers, we actually have access to a potentially influential toolkit many others can’t unlock.

We have the power of our words.

Words alone, of course, are not enough to trigger a shift in the way things are. But they’re often enough to trigger curiosity, and changes in thought — maybe even considerations about altering opinions and/or behaviors.

That’s right — your words can help convince someone, multiple someones, to spread the word. To act.

In the wake of Las Vegas earlier this week, I approached my editor about covering the topic of blood donation — something not enough outlets were talking about at the time.

I figured it might convince whoever the piece might reach to give blood, if they were able, because that’s what was needed. That was a very important way people not even local to the incident could help.

Part of me felt guilty for turning something terrible into a story idea. I considered not even bothering, because I didn’t — still don’t — like even the possibility that I’m using someone else’s pain for some kind of gain, even indirectly.

But one thing we have to remember, when writing in the aftermath of terrible things, is that our words can still help people. No matter what we’re writing about, it’s often another way to help.

Don’t shy away from your ideas because you don’t think they’ll reach anyone, or because you’re convinced it’s been talked about enough already. You don’t have to be the one to break the news. You can add to the conversation. Join in the call to act. You might be the fifteenth post someone reads about the same topic, but yours could finally push them over the edge, and convince them to do something.

That’s the thing about online publishing. You just never know who you might reach — and who might take away more from your words than they initially expected to.


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a nine-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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You’re Going to Write a Lot of Things You’ll Never Get Recognition For

That’s just how this works now.

This is the reality no one wants to accept.

And that’s why so many writers, with so much potential, just give up.

They write, and they write, and they write. And they receive little to no reward for most of it.

For whatever reason, we don’t like that. We want to be read. That’s what writing is for.

But it’s the writers who can suck it up and keep going anyway that separate the accomplished writers from the aspiring.

I write thousands of words every week. I do this despite the fact that about three-fourths of them, though published on the internet for all to see, go unread.

This is how publishing works. No matter how long you’ve been writing, no matter how hard you’ve been working, you cannot reach everyone. You will never reach everyone. And that does not mean you are not good at what you do. It does not mean you shouldn’t keep going.

When no one reads what you have written, that should not take away from the fact that you have written it.

Sometimes, the reasons behind why people aren’t reading your work are completely out of your control. You might catch something on the tail end of a news cycle and miss the mark. You might write something amazing, but in the wrong channel, reaching the wrong audience.

You might write something similar to what someone with a greater social influence and following writes, and publish it around the same time, even unknowingly. Your words get lost, while theirs go viral.

There is no magic formula for writing winning content every single time. There are strategies we all use to increase our probability of success. But even these don’t guarantee that we’re going to watch our words get quoted and shared a dozen times over.

I know you’re looking for that formula. I’ve looked for it too. But like a superfood, a medication, a new therapy technique, there’s no way to predict whether or not the results will always work out in your favor. Often times, whether or not people read your work has a lot more to do with whether or not they stumble upon it. And a lot of times, we just don’t have the genuine online following to make that happen in a big way.

This is why I believe slow growth is the best growth. I would much rather collect 100 new followers over the span of six months than a thousand in six days. I want all discovery of everything I’ve written to come about because people are legitimately interested in what I have to say. So what if I write something I’m proud of and most people don’t care? You’re allowed to be proud of your accomplishments, even when no one else is.

You’re going to write a lot of things. And many of these things, people won’t read, or like, or share.

Don’t always use these things as metrics for whether or not you’re doing good work. Not on their own, anyway.

Focus on the very small amount of people who do acknowledge your work. And if no one does, well, first realize that you might not be at fault. Then keep writing — keep trying different things until something starts working. This might take months or years. But with the over-saturation of things published online, that’s just how it works now. Honestly, some people do get lucky. It’s OK if you aren’t one of them. That doesn’t make you any less of a writer or hard worker.

Value your work. That’s what draws people in. If you care, eventually, you’ll come across others who do, too.


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a nine-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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