The Best of Novelty Revisions (2019)

Another year. Another bunch of posts y’all liked for some reason. (:

When I started blogging, I never imagined I would get to a point where publishing over 350 posts a year would be considered “normal.” And yet here we are.

There are a lot of things I could say about 2019 in general, and furthermore, my 2019 specifically. It has not been an easy 12 months. I have not accomplished even close to the number of things I hoped to do. What I was sure would be a bright, progressive year ended up being a very long and dreary point in time that I am very much looking forward to leaving behind.

But writing-wise, I have done more in the past 365 days than I have in the past five years. I’ve worked on stories that have challenged me. I have jumped on opportunities that excited me. I set a really, really big goal. As I am writing this, I haven’t exactly accomplished that yet. But I’m close. And by the time you are reading this, I will have been able to say I succeeded.

Of all the many things I am grateful for in this season of reflection and planning, I am most grateful for your support. Even on my worst days, even through my worst posts, even though I have not always been at my best or produced my best work, you have stuck around. I don’t know why. I know I don’t deserve it. But I wanted to take the time to thank you. More than anything, I wish I could have done more this year to help you. I wish I could have interacted with you more. I wish I could have offered more extra inspiration to get you through the months that are now behind us.

But don’t worry. I have plans. I can’t promise anything is going to happen anytime soon — I am taking some time off to rest and recharge (posts will still go up, you won’t even know I’m gone). I’m not giving up on you, though. We are all stronger together. As always, my passion for this work is going to take this platform places it has never been before.

In the meantime, let’s all take a few minutes to look back on some of the best things to come out of my work on this blog in 2019. These were the posts you all clicked on and read most. Some of the titles on this list surprised me. But it’s good to see what you found most helpful in your writing lives this year.

I hope you all had a wonderful holiday season. Here’s to a bright, joyful, and productive 2020.

How I Trained Myself to Write 25,000 Words Every Week (and Why I Did It

“There’s this misconception that if you’re a “real” writer, writing will never feel like work. This simply is not true. While your passion for writing might give you a sense of purpose that makes you feel fulfilled no matter what you’re writing, the truth is, sometimes you just aren’t going to feel like writing.” Read more


How to Stay Interested In Your Story Long Enough to Finish Writing It

“The truth is, it may not be your fault entirely. You see, all writers are always learning regardless of how much they may have written in the past, and it’s quite possible you’re still figuring out the ingredients that make up the recipe of an interesting story.” Read more


12 Things No One Expects to Happen When They Become a Writer

“When you first start out, you’re actually not very good at this whole writing thing. And even though there’s a lot of advice out there, the only way you’ll ever really get better at it is by doing it.” Read more


12 Essential Reminders for Anyone Getting Ready to Start Writing a Book

“Reading other books as you write yours is actually a great way to stay motivated and keep the ideas flowing. You’re not “stealing” ideas from other stories when a book inspires you to create something of your own.” Read more


How to Write Better: A Quick Guide

“Every writer — even the intermediate or advanced — wants to know how they can get from where they are right now skill-wise to a better place. After all, a writer should never stop seeking out ways to do their job better. That’s why we practice. It’s why we read books about writing, go to conferences, interact with other writers, and take classes when we can.” Read more


12 Signs It’s Time to Say Goodbye to Your Writing Project

“You realize you haven’t been making the time to work on it because you really don’t want to anymore.” Read more


You Don’t Have to Be ‘Good’ At Writing (Right Away) to Be Successful

“These days, it’s nearly impossible to visit a writing Facebook group, follow a stream of writers on Twitter, or browse books on Amazon without realizing there are people releasing new books EVERY WEEK. Some of them are even REALLY GOOD BOOKS! Why aren’t you doing that?!” Read more


Should You Tell Your Friend They’re Bad at Writing?

“As humans often do, I turned this question back on myself and tried to imagine myself as the bad writer friend dreaming big. Would I want someone to tell me my writing kind of sucked? Or would I have a better experience continuing to write to my heart’s content and chase my dreams even if it wasn’t likely they’d come true?” Read more


12 Misconceptions About Being a Writer

“Writers secretly and purposefully add people they know into their stories and don’t tell them. (Some people do it, but most of the time we base characters off of people we know, not turn people we know into characters.)” Read more


Why So Many Beginning Writers Never Become Successful

“There are a lot of people who want to be writers. They call themselves writers. They walk around with heads full of ideas and hearts full of hopes. There is nothing wrong with wanting to be something, and everyone deserves to dream big. But far too many of these dreams die.” Read more


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a 10-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


Help Novelty Revisions become a more valuable resource for aspiring writers.  Join us on Patreon.

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