Novelty Revisions Is Going On Hiatus

It’s going to take a long time to return to where I was — writing a lot, and often. And loving it.

Yesterday was the first time I’d written something in over two weeks — possibly the longest break from writing I’ve taken in years.

It took two hours to write 500 words. But I wrote them.

It’s going to take a long time to return to where I was — writing a lot, and often. And loving it.

I started this blog because of my love for writing and my hope that I could share what I was learning with other aspiring writers such as myself. Inspiring creators and offering hope to the down and discouraged has become a passion I never expected to discover from an 11-year-old blog.

Right now, though I know that passion and excitement will return in time, it’s buried deep beneath a barely manageable amount of pain and mistrust and uncertainty.

Putting myself out there right now, even through words, is extremely difficult and draining. I deeply value myself and my work and what I have to offer all of you. But certain recent events have forced me to question what writing really means to me. How it’s meant to fit into my life moving forward. Where I want to take it. How I want to use it.

To continue on pretending I have the confidence and stamina to offer help and advice to writers would be dishonest, if behind the screen I didn’t myself believe my words held any meaning.

I care about all of you and want to do whatever I can to help you succeed.

But not right now.

I will return — in a week? A month? A year? I don’t know.

I’ve lost my spark.

And I won’t return until I’ve found it again.

Take care of yourselves. Keep writing. Don’t give up.

But if you need to take a break … take a break. I doubt you’ll regret it.


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is an editor and writer, and a 12-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food, and Star Wars.

12 Things Writers Can Actually Control

4. Whether or not you submit your work to an editor, publisher, agent, or publication — and when.

1. What you write about on your own time.

2. Your writing goals.

3. Whether or not you decide to write instead of doing … literally anything else.

4. Whether or not you submit your work to an editor, publisher, agent, or publication — and when.

Continue reading “12 Things Writers Can Actually Control”

10 Things All Writers Must Learn About Rejection

2. It hurts because you care. Because you’re passionate about your work. You genuinely want to succeed.

1. It happens to everyone — but that doesn’t mean you have to pretend it doesn’t bother you.

2. It hurts because you care. Because you’re passionate about your work. You genuinely want to succeed.

3. It’s not always because you did something “wrong.” Sometimes, e.g., a pitch and a magazine just don’t match.

4. You will not bounce back from rejection the same way every time. Each will affect you differently. And that’s OK.

Continue reading “10 Things All Writers Must Learn About Rejection”

12 Lessons My Creative Writing Mentor Taught Me

4. Learn how to write from people writing better than you.

1. You’re never so good at writing that you don’t need to practice, learn, or grow.

2. Sharing your work publicly isn’t optional.

3. It doesn’t matter how “bad” you think it is. Submit it. You have nothing to lose but your fear of failing.

4. Learn how to write from people writing better than you.

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10 Lies About Writing That Might Be Holding You Back

4. If writing is a struggle for you, it must not be “for you.”

1. Once you decide on a writing goal, you can never change it.

2. You should never tell other people about your ideas.

3. You need to have an advanced degree in writing or a related subject to be successful.

4. If writing is a struggle for you, it must not be “for you.”

Continue reading “10 Lies About Writing That Might Be Holding You Back”

The 12 Habits of Writers Who Can Focus on More Than One Project at a Time

3. Recognizing the difference between opportunities and distractions.

1. Saying yes more often than you say no — but also saying no when your plate is full.

2. Setting ambitious yet manageable writing goals.

3. Recognizing the difference between opportunities and distractions.

4. Setting limits. A few projects at a time — great. After three or four, you’re kind of getting into “my head is spinning and I can’t sleep and also what are words” territory.

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10 Lessons Your Unfinished Writing Projects Will Teach You

4. Continuing to work on a project you have no passion for or interest in (just for the sake of finishing it) is never worth it.

1. Even 500 words of a story is an accomplishment worth celebrating.

2. You’ll forget about the unfinished stories that never would have landed anyway — and that’s OK.

3. You will forgive yourself for walking away. Most of the time, it’s for the best.

4. Continuing to work on a project you have no passion for or interest in is never worth it.

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The 12 Things No One Ever Tells You About Writing for Other People

Writing for companies and websites isn’t always the end goal, but it’s worth it.

1. You often, technically, do not own your work, even when your name is on it.

2. But working for a large company with a website can get you the exposure you need to branch out.

3. Not all writing opportunities will give you the chance to work closely one-on-one with an editor.

4. But the ones that do will change your life.

Continue reading “The 12 Things No One Ever Tells You About Writing for Other People”

10 Reminders for Writers Who Are So Done With the Internet (Ugh)

3. Once you learn about distracting website blocking apps, you’ll never go back.

1. Twitter isn’t the only place to share your work/connect with writers, and it’s probably not the best, either.

2. Writing forums and Facebook groups still exist – and they might serve as better communities to be a part of, if you can find positive, supportive ones.

3. Once you learn about distracting website blocking apps, you’ll never go back.

4. You don’t “need” the internet to write a book. You don’t have to know every detail when you’re writing a first draft, even if your brain tries to convince you otherwise.

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12 Tips for Writers Struggling to Rebound After Rejection

5. Don’t ask yourself what you did wrong. Instead, look at what you can do better next time.

1. Make it about the work you submitted, not yourself. Your work and your worth are two separate things.

2. Don’t treat rejection as a failure. View it as a chance to learn and grow. (I know that sounds like a fluff response, but never underestimate the power of asking: “What do I need to learn from this experience?”)

3. If your rejection came in the form of an email or phone call, try not to keep rereading or replaying it over and over. There might come a point where you can look it over to learn from it (if it includes helpful feedback), but not right now. Not yet.

4. Work on a project for no reason other than it brings you joy. Focus, for now, on what makes you happy.

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