Feel Like Writing Isn’t Worth It? You’re Wrong.

Is the struggle worth the reward?

Since your writing journey began, there have likely been many weeks filled with days when writing did not feel worth it.

I can safely assume this because it is normal. It likely happens to every single one of us. Because there are going to be days you look at something you worked really hard on and wonder why no one has read it. Days when you’ve gotten one too many rejections in a short span of time and not a single one of them has told you what you’re doing wrong. Days you would rather be doing anything else besides writing, because lately, it’s felt like writing has only brought you disappointment and pain.

Those days may be many in number. But they are not the only days you’ve had or will have. And the “dark days” of your time as a writer will not last forever.

No. They will come and go. Even with success as a writer comes struggles of a different kind. You will always struggle. But that does not mean you will always face the same struggles, or that your tough times won’t lead to triumph as long as you keep riding the waves.

No one likes to struggle. No one likes to sit down to do something they like and want to make their career only to feel like all their energy and effort has been one giant waste of time.

But where would we be without struggle? What lessons would we learn if all this were easy? Writing is not hard because we are bad at it or not built for it. Writing is hard because it is trying to teach us that in life, you don’t just get what you want by wanting it. You get what you want by working for it. Well, most people do, anyway.

If you are a struggling writer, that’s a good thing. It means you’re doing everything you know how to Make Writing Happen, and not every aspiring writer can say that. It means you’re taking on the task even though you know it will be challenging.

It means you’re trying. Writers who don’t struggle don’t struggle because they don’t try.

It’s going to be hard, and it’s not going to get easier overall. There’s nothing you can do to change that. The only thing you can do is keep your mind and heart on the goal you want to reach, figure out exactly what you need to do to get there, and do it. No matter how long it takes. No matter how many times you fail and have to start over.

Dive headfirst into the struggle. And know that if you try hard enough, one way or another, it’s going to be worth it. Even if things don’t turn out exactly the way you hoped they would in the end (things rarely do). It will be worth it. Keep going until you learn how worth it your efforts have been. Never stop. Never look back. Always forward. Always toward greater things.


Meg is the creator of Novelty Revisions, dedicated to helping writers put their ideas into words. She is a staff writer with The Cheat Sheet, a freelance editor and writer, and a 10-time NaNoWriMo winner. Follow Meg on Twitter for tweets about writing, food and nerdy things.


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8 thoughts on “Feel Like Writing Isn’t Worth It? You’re Wrong.

  1. Thanks for this post! ☺️ It can sometimes be frustrating and lonely, this journey as a writer. It’s only my passion and need to write that keeps me going. Self doubt and second guessing rear their mean little heads every now and then.

  2. Very true words. I’m approaching the last section of my book and struggling slightly as the end nears … I know that it’s going to be hard when I start to look into the scary world of agents, publishers and editors but … baby steps and all that. Thanks for the post. Katie

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